Change is Afoot at HCTF

Change is Afoot at HCTF
As a granting organization, HCTF relies very heavily on our science based technical review process to review grant applications and make recommendations to the Board regarding project funding. Since 2010, Lynne Bonner in her role as Manager, Evaluation has been the person who leads and manages this critical business function for HCTF. As many of you know, Lynne recently decided to retire effective March 31, 2016, and the Foundation subsequently ran a competition to find a replacement for Lynne - no simple task! The position garnered a lot of attention and we had 78 applicants from across North America. Following a thorough interview and screening process (of which Lynne was one of the panel members), we are happy to announce that Kathryn Martell was the successful candidate for the position. Kathryn has an M. Sc from the University of Alberta and brings experience working with both government and NGOs, including The Land Conservancy of BC and the Garry Oak Ecosystem Recovery Team. Kathryn starts with the Foundation in January of 2016, and there will be an overlap and transition period from that point until the end of March 2016. Thru that time, Lynne will mentor Kathryn in her new role,...
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Building the Next Generation of Fish & Wildlife Biologists

Building the Next Generation of Fish & Wildlife Biologists
British Columbia is currently undergoing a period of rapid environmental change: the province’s accelerated rate of industrial expansion combined with climate change has increased the need for experienced professionals capable of addressing growing environmental challenges. The imminent retirement of a significant percentage of BC's current conservation experts has upped the urgency in cultivating the next generation of fish and wildlife professionals. Training for these hands-on careers requires moving beyond the classroom and out into the field. As part of HCTF’s commitment to building a better future for BC's fish, wildlife and habitat, we’ve helped fund paid summer internships for BCIT students in the  Ecological Restoration Program . These internships provide invaluable real-world experience for students as they work alongside professional biologists from HCTF partner organizations. In the following video series, you’ll hear from students and their mentors about the benefits of this program for building conservation capacity in BC. After you’ve watched the videos, scroll down for a more in-depth conversation with the students about their experiences with the internship program, and some advice for young people considering a career in conservation. Part 1: Introduction Part 2: Delta Farmland Project Part 3: Grauer Wetland Project Meet the Interns Emma de...
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HCTF's New Strategic Plan

HCTF's New Strategic Plan
The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation has released its new Strategic Plan. Over the next five years, this plan will serve as a roadmap to help us work towards our vision of a future where fish, wildlife and habitats are healthy and valued by all British Columbians. View plan>>
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Return of the Roosevelts

Return of the Roosevelts
Elk Translocation Program on Vancouver Island Aims to Restore Roosevelt Elk to Their Former Range  BC’s magnificent wildlife has long formed part of our province’s identity. Take the provincial Coat of Arms: while other Western provinces have chosen to include the likes of lions and unicorns into their designs, a pair of iconic ungulates make up BC’s provincial emblem. On the right, a bighorn ram represents the wildlife of the mainland. On the left, a rather wild-looking Roosevelt elk symbolizes Vancouver Island.  The Roosevelt is a fitting representative for the Island: it remains a stronghold for this species whose range was severely reduced following the arrival of the Europeans in the mid-19 th century. Though Roosevelts remain on BC’s list of species of concern, populations in some areas of the Island are thriving, to the point where conflicts are arising between humans and herds. On the Island’s east coast, near the village of Sayward, the Salmon River watershed is ideal habitat for elk. The moist, rich soils of the river’s floodplain produce optimal forage for Roosevelts, both in the form of native plant species and agricultural crops. This vegetational bounty has allowed elk numbers to increase to the point where...
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BCWF Wetlands Institute - Building Capacity for Restoring Wetlands

BCWF Wetlands Institute - Building Capacity for Restoring Wetlands
Each year, the BC Wildlife Federation (BCWF) hosts an intensive week of workshops led by wetland restoration experts, providing hands-on training for participants interested in constructing wetlands in their communities. The workshops are held in a different region of the province each year, and 2015 was the Okanagan’s turn. As BCWF Wetlands Education Program Intern Kayla Akins reports, this year’s institute was jammed-packed with information and opportunities for participants to get their hands dirty completing wetlands restoration projects in Kelowna and Vernon. The passion for wetland restoration and protection drew participants from all over BC to the Okanagan for the BC Wildlife Federation’s 13th Wetlands Institute. Participants included Biologists, Landscape Technologists and Architects, Environmental Planners, Coordinators, Educators, Consultants and more. We were joined by members of Environment Canada, the Okanagan Nation Alliance, the Okanagan Collaborative Conservation Program, the Okanagan Basin Water Board, and the Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resource Operations, to name a few. We dove right in on the first day with a presentation on wetland restoration techniques from Tom Biebighauser, a wildlife biologist and wetland ecologist. He covered various strategies for wetland restoration and construction. With this information fresh in mind, we headed over to the...
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