HCTF-McCubbing Scholarship Winners Announced

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The inaugural winners of the HCTF McCubbing Scholarships were announced today at the BC Institute of Technology (BCIT) in Burnaby, BC. Fish, Wildlife and Recreation Program students Jessie Chestnut and Erin Sowerby Greene and Ecological Restoration students Alecia Lannan and Ryan Lee were each awarded a $5000 scholarship to assist with the completion of their studies at BCIT . The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation (HCTF) created the scholarships in memory of Don McCubbing, a fisheries biologist who passed away in 2015. Don’s legacy of academic and professional achievements in fisheries biology and habitat restoration included many scientific publications and innovations in fisheries management. Don strongly believed in educating and training the next generation of fisheries biologists through practical field work and technical skills training. He volunteered time training students at BCIT, an institution he believed was a leader in teaching field biology, specifically the Fish, Wildlife and Recreation and Ecological Restoration programs, where students gained practical field experience in fisheries management and habitat restoration. For several years, Don also participated in HCTF’s Fisheries Technical Review Committee and brought a wealth of practical experience and science based decision making to the project review process. HCTF congratulates all of this year’s scholarship...
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HCTF is Hiring

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HCTF is looking for a Conservation Grants Specialist to join our team.  The Conservation Grants Specialist is instrumental in administering our grants application process. They also participate in the grant and project evaluation process, manage our proposal-tracking database, and contribute to other technical assignments related to program delivery. For more details, please see our  Careers  webpage.
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Explosive Start to Restoring Steelhead Passage on the Coquihalla River

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     A huge chunk of rock and debris preventing summer steelhead from reaching their spawning grounds has been at least partially cleared, thanks to a partnership between government, engineers, and non-profits. A fallen railway support abutment from the historic Kettle Valley Railway had been blocking fish passage up Othello Falls on the Coquihalla River since 2014. Using low-velocity explosives, engineers have split the blockage into smaller pieces, which should be able to be washed downstream by fall and winter high-water events. HCTF provided funding for this project along with the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC, who have a fantastic write-up of the project on their blog .    

Help Bats for Halloween

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As Halloween approaches, images of scary, blood-sucking bats become common place. This is the perfect time of year to join with the BC Community Bat Program to counter these bat myths and do something to help bats.    “The conservation of bats in BC has always been important, since over half the species in this province are considered at risk” says Mandy Kellner, Coordinator for the BC Community Bat Program. “However, with the discovery of White-nose Syndrome in Washington State, bat conservation is more important than ever.”   White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is a disease caused by an introduced fungus, first detected in North America in a cave in New York in 2006. Since it was discovered, it has spread to 31 states and 5 provinces in North America, decimating bat populations along the way. “Luckily, WNS is not yet in BC” continues Kellner, “But we are preparing for its arrival by raising awareness about bats, working with landowners who have bats in buildings, enhancing bat habitat, and monitoring populations.”   Community Bat projects across the province are hosting talks and events in association with Bat Week (October 24 – 31) to provide information and guidance on ways to help bats. ...
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HCTF Board Member Receives Aldo Leopold Memorial Award

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We are thrilled to announce that Dr. Winifred Kessler was named the recipient of the prestigious Aldo Leopold Memorial Award at The Willdife Society ’s Annual Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The award is the Society’s highest honour, and Wini is the second woman to receive it in its 67 year history. The award recognizes Wini’s tremendous contribution to conservation, including more than 15 years of service on HCTF’s Board of Directors. Congratulations Wini on this well-deserved award!