HCTF Featured in Fishing with Rod YouTube Video

HCTF Featured in Fishing with Rod YouTube Video
HCTF was recently featured in a YouTube video created by Fishing with Rod about purchasing freshwater fishing licences. The video explains how to use the Province’s e-licencing system, and talks about some of the fisheries and conservation benefits derived from licence fees and surcharges.     Still need to purchase or renew your licence? Use Rod’s tips to navigate the e-licencing system at http://www.fishing.gov.bc.ca/ , or search for a vendor in your area.  

News Release: Foundation’s Conservation Grants Top $150 Million

News Release: Foundation’s Conservation Grants Top $150 Million
Kelowna, BC – The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation has announced it has committed another $6.1 Million to fish and wildlife projects across BC. This year’s grants will bring the total amount invested by the Foundation in conservation projects to over $150 Million since its beginnings in 1981. The Foundation is unique among other environmental granting organizations in that the revenue used for project funding comes from conservation surcharges on angling, hunting, guide outfitting and trapping licences. “HCTF is a concrete symbol of the user’s investment in the resource,” said Foundation Chair, Harvey Andrusak. “Few people realize how much of the critical conservation work taking place in this Province is funded by anglers, hunters, guide outfitters and trappers.” Grant recipients include provincial government biologists, municipalities, universities, and local land trusts. They use Foundation funding to improve conditions for many different kinds of native fish and wildlife, from majestic mountain goats and endangered Fraser River sturgeon, to at-risk amphibians such as the Coastal-tailed frog. "We all benefit,” says Andrusak, “These projects improve conditions for a tremendous range of species, not just those targeted by contributors.” You can find a complete list of 2014-15 grant recipients and projects here . Download Regional Copies...
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New Logo for PCAF Program

New Logo for PCAF Program
HCTF’s Public Conservation Assistance Fund has a new look. The granting program, which provides funding for on-the-ground conservation work with a strong volunteer component, recently had its logo refreshed to be more closely aligned with that of HCTF. Though different in style, the new PCAF logo has maintained some of the design elements of the previous version, inspired by the program’s tagline “A helping hand for fish and wildlife in BC”.   You can download different versions of the logo for use on project communications materials here . Applying for PCAF Funding Each year, the PCAF program provides small grants to projects that restore habitat, monitor wildlife populations, or involve other activities that get more people involved in conservation at the grassroots level. If you or your organization has a great idea for a project benefitting fish or wildlife, visit our PCAF grant information webpage to find out how to apply . Applications must be submitted by May 17 th , so start working on your proposal today!    

60+ Reasons to Renew Your Licence

60+ Reasons to Renew Your Licence
Today marks the first day of a new fishing season, and that means licence renewal time. You may already be aware that your licence fees pay for lake stocking programs, but did you know that your licence purchase also provides funding for fish conservation projects across BC? Almost all freshwater fishing licences sold in the province include a conservation surcharge directed to the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation. HCTF invests angling surcharge revenue into science-based conservation projects working to maintain and enhance BC’s freshwater fish and their habitats. Last year, angling licence surcharges provided approximately $2.5 Million in funding for 60 different fish conservation projects. These include: Conference Creek Watershed Restoration Project (Vancouver Island, Approved for $42K): Coastal cutthroat trout are a species of special concern in BC, having become locally extinct in areas of Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland where their populations once flourished. The main reason for the species’ decline is habitat loss and degradation caused by forestry, agriculture and urbanization. The Conference Creek project is working to restore degraded cutthroat trout habitat by reconnecting creeks to their historical channels. This partnership of NGOS, government and local First Nations has identified the most productive streams in the area,...
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Going Batty in Peachland

Going Batty in Peachland
What was first thought to be a liability has turned into a biological treasure in Peachland, where one of the largest known maternity colonies of Yuma bats in B.C. has been welcomed—instead of being destroyed. Located in the attic of a 108-year-old building which was originally the community’s primary school, the bat roost, where as many as 2,000 bats give birth to their pups and raise those young each spring, is now home also to the community’s Chamber of Commerce, tourism centre and the Boys and Girls Club. Those humans share the main floor of the lakefront building, which has undergone extensive renovations, while the maternity colony of bats roost upstairs during the day, swooping one-by-one through the dormers each evening to forage for insects. Biologist Tanya Luszcz says it’s estimated that this number of bats can consume half to one-and-a-half tonnes of insects in a summer, including many species that are human and agriculture pests. They contribute immensely to the community’s insect control efforts, but are often taken for granted. The tiny mammals have likely made the attic their maternity roost for decades, but the size of the colony came to light when the community began discussing whether to tear...
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