Antelope Brush Property Secured

Antelope Brush Property Secured
The Nature Trust of British Columbia  has just announced the successful acquisition of 30 acres of endangered antelope-brush habitat in the South Okanagan . The purchase was made possible by a $500,000 contribution by the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation as part of its acquisition granting program . “Antelope-brush is the latest purchase of conservation land made possible through the contributions of the anglers, hunters, guide outfitters and trappers of BC. In the past two years alone, the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation has invested $1.3 million of their licence surcharges into the securement of over 1300 hectares of valuable South Okanagan habitat,” said Brian Springinotic, CEO of the Foundation. “The proximity of the Antelope-brush property to other conservation lands will allow wildlife to move between protected areas - a critical feature when working to preserve biodiversity in areas fragmented by development.” The property is adjacent to The Nature Trust’s Antelope-brush Conservation Area , home to more than 20 species at risk, including over 50% of the Canadian population of Behr’s Hairstreak butterfly . Other federally or provincially listed species at risk that are known to occur on these lands include Bighorn Sheep, Pallid Bat, Desert Night Snake, Great Basin Spadefoot, and...
Continue reading
3285 Hits

Good Neighbours Project Wins HCTF Silver Award

Good Neighbours Project Wins HCTF Silver Award
The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation was pleased to present the Habitat Acquisition Trust (HAT) with a Silver Award for the Good Neighbours Project at their AGM last Wednesday. HAT is a land trust operating in Greater Victoria that aims to help citizens better understand and care for habitats within the region. Their Good Neighbours program assists property owners in meeting their land use needs while simultaneously protecting some of Canada’s rarest habitats. Each year, HAT focuses its outreach services on a different region of Capital Regional District. Their engagement of neighbours and students in science-based demonstration projects benefits local ecosystems and creates lasting networks within communities. The HCTF Silver Award is just the latest accolade for Good Neighbours Program - it has also won a CRD Ecostar Award . For more information on this program and how you can become involved, visit HAT’s website      
2812 Hits
Featured

News Coverage of Delta Farmlands Project

News Coverage of Delta Farmlands Project
Global News BC ran the following story on HCTF Project #2-349, the Provision of Waterfowl & Raptor Habitat within Managed Grasslands on Lower Fraser River Farmland. The Foundation has contributed over $150,000 to this project, which encourages farmers to plant their fields with winter cover crops and create grassland set-asides. These programs are designed to simultaneously benefit farmers and wildlife by improving soil conditions while creating habitat.  Winter cover crops provide a valuable food source for migratory birds, and grassland-set asides support small mammal populations and create raptor hunting grounds. Earlier this year, HCTF did an evaluation of this project, which you can read about  here . You can find out more about the Winter Crop Cover and Grassland Set-asides programs by visiting the Delta Farmland & Wildlife Trust website .    
3441 Hits
Featured

BC's Wild/ Domestic Sheep Separation Program

BC's Wild/ Domestic Sheep Separation Program
The November rut is a magnificent display of strength and agility, a refined ritual that has been practiced by bighorns for centuries. The sights and sounds of these iconic B.C. mammals vying for dominance evoke a sense of respect for the ruggedness of a species that Theodore Roosevelt referred to as "one of the noblest beasts". Yet the rut can be a treacherous time for bighorns, far beyond the risk of injury from their intra-species tussles. For these highly social animals, the real danger can lie with the company they keep. Wild sheep share a number of similarities with their domestic cousins: they will use the same forage and water sources, and can even interbreed. Where bighorn range and domestic sheep operations overlap, it's understandable that a randy ram might find a large flock of domestic ewes worth a closer look. Unfortunately, these forays can have deadly consequences. Even nose-to-nose contact between the two species can result in the transfer of a pathogen lethal to wild sheep. And because it takes time for animals to become symptomatic, an infected (but visibly healthy) bighorn that returns to its herd will spread the disease, potentially decimating an entire population. For nearly a...
Continue reading
Tags:
13341 Hits

HCTF Project Nominated for Premier’s Award

HCTF Project Nominated for Premier’s Award
The Vancouver Island Urban Lakes Infrastructure project has been named a regional finalist in the BC Premier's Awards, the Province's highest form of recognition for innovation and excellence in the public service. The project was nominated in recognition of its success in bringing together the technical expertise of Ministry staff with the financial support of conservation organizations and local governments, resulting in the installation of over a quarter million dollars worth of fishing infrastructure at no upfront or ongoing cost to the Province. The docks, walkways and trails installed as part of the program at eight urban lakes are already proving popular with anglers, many of them families or people with mobility issues whom previously found it challenging to find accessible fishing spots. The following video features some of the partners speaking about the benefits of the project. You can also read more about the program on our project profiles page .
Tags:
1577 Hits