Update on the Fisher Den Box Project

Can’t get enough fisher footage ? HCTF project leader Larry Davis has put together another video update on the artificial den box project with some fantastic video captured with some innovative use of a Go-Pro and a selfie-stick:   Larry writes: “Work at the start of this fiscal year focused on identifying any den boxes that were being used by fishers for reproductive purposes. We monitored all den boxes on a monthly basis by inspecting the inside of each box with a Go-Pro camera inserted through the door. In addition, hair-snaggers installed at the entrance of each box are examined and these were collected when any hair was present. Den boxes that were receiving attention by fishers also had motion detection cameras positioned to capture video of any fisher using the structure. DNA samples from the winter of 2016-17 and the 2017 denning period were submitted for analysis in July 2017. Results of the analysis indicate 26 fisher samples were obtained out of the 39 samples submitted. Other species in the samples included red squirrel (8), American marten, (4), and one black bear. Of the fisher samples, we had 9 different individuals leave DNA at the denboxes (7F and 2M)...
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Tunkwa Lake Watershed Project by Brian Chan

There are a lot of great fishing lakes located in the Southern Interior region of BC. Ideal water chemistry, long, hot growing seasons and managed populations of stocked rainbow, brook trout and kokanee provide a diversity of angling experiences. A quick look at a map of the Merritt, Logan Lake and Kamloops area will reveal just how many small lake fisheries are waiting to be fished. One of the most popular groups of stillwaters is those found within the Tunkwa Lake watershed. They include Tunkwa, Leighton, Morgan and Six Mile lakes. Each year over 30,000 angler days are spent plying these waters in search of rainbow trout. Recreational fishing within this watershed has been a popular pastime for over 70 years. Tunkwa Lake Resort has been in operation for over the past 40 years and in 1996 Tunkwa and Leighton lakes were the cornerstones of the newly created Tunkwa Lake Provincial Park. The development of the recreational fisheries within the Tunkwa watershed was in large part the result of creek diversions and construction of dams on key lakes in an effort to store and supply water for downstream agricultural purposes. Some of the original irrigation works done by pioneering ranching...
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Marten vs. Goshawk

What happens when a marten’s meal is interrupted by a curious goshawk? Watch the video  to find out!   Thanks so much to Shannon Crowley and Dexter Hodder for sharing this amazing footage from their HCTF-funded project ,  " Marten Population Responses to Accelerated Salvage Logging in MPB Stands in Central BC ".

Poop Gives the Scoop on Who's Roosting Where

Many thanks to the Habitat Acquisition Trust for providing this update on the Community Bat Project!    Victoria, BC – November 2, 2017. During annual bat counts, Habitat Acquisition Trust volunteers and Bat Habitat Stewards collect guano samples from beneath the bat roosts. That’s a polite way of saying, we collect bat poop. Not to whisk away to fertilize gardens and restoration sites, but in the name of citizen science. The guano collected gets sent off for genetic analysis, to determine the species of bats living at each roost. We can’t tell what bats are living in a colony when they whoosh out of their homes at night and we don’t want to disturb the bats by physically capturing them. So this provides a safe means of understanding who’s roosting where. This genetic analysis, coupled with listening devices that interpret bat calls called Echometers is allowing HAT to build a more comprehensive understanding of bat populations. On their own, Echometers are most useful for sites where there isn’t easy access to collect guano. Since the listening devices can pick up bats roosting in nearby trees, and since the device sometimes narrows the calls down to several different species. Some of the bat...
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Explosive Start to Restoring Steelhead Passage on the Coquihalla River

     A huge chunk of rock and debris preventing summer steelhead from reaching their spawning grounds has been at least partially cleared, thanks to a partnership between government, engineers, and non-profits. A fallen railway support abutment from the historic Kettle Valley Railway had been blocking fish passage up Othello Falls on the Coquihalla River since 2014. Using low-velocity explosives, engineers have split the blockage into smaller pieces, which should be able to be washed downstream by fall and winter high-water events. HCTF provided funding for this project along with the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC, who have a fantastic write-up of the project on their blog .