87+ Acres Conserved for Bighorn Sheep

Penticton —The Nature Trust of British Columbia is pleased to announce the purchase of the Skaha Lake Eastside property near Penticton with the support of many partners and donors.  “So glad there’s been success with the Skaha Lake property,” said Judie Steeves, West Kelowna freelance writer. “As a kid, I used to go hike up on those bluffs and sit and contemplate the future as I looked out over Skaha Lake. I love that area. Saw my first rattler in the wild there, too.” This property which spans 35.4 hectares (87.5 acres) features critical habitat for Bighorn Sheep and other wildlife on the eastside of Skaha Lake. It is adjacent to our existing Skaha Lake Property complex which is included in the McTaggart-Cowan/Nsək’łniw’t Wildlife Management Area. This land has a variety of habitat ideal for Bighorn Sheep. The open grassland dotted with ponderosa pines and Douglas-fir provides grazing area and the rocky steep bluffs provide protection from predators.  “This property is one of the last remaining undeveloped benchlands on the eastside of Skaha Lake,” said Nicholas Burdock, The Nature Trust of BC’s Okanagan Conservation Land Coordinator. “It takes you only a few steps to recognize how beautiful this location is...
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Photos of Englishman River Estuary Restoration

We love to receive photos of our grant recipients' conservation projects, and the Vancouver Island Conservation Lands Management Program  (VICLMP), in conjunction with The Nature Trust of BC , has been doing a fantastic job of capturing and sharing their progress in restoring the Englishman River Estuary in Parksville, BC .  Thanks to Tom Reid, VICLMP Manager, for these images.  Day 1: Removing the remnant roadway that bisected the estuary.  Day 2: Road removal continues Day 3: 1500 cubic metres of fill removed...    Resulting in water flowing through this area of the Englishman Estuary for the first time in over 50 years!  The next day, the first new occupants are already moving in. By the end of day 4, the team has removed 2500m 3  of fill.  Day 5: An early start, but more than half way there. Shorebirds come to check out the newly restored area: Week 2: Placement of large woody debris for fish habitat and connecting the channels. By the end of week 2, 3500 cubic metres of fill had been removed, channels connected, and fish habitat structures installed. Great job! You can read more about the Englishman River Estuary Restoration Project here , or follow VICLMP on twitter for more updates...
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Salmon Arm Watering Bee Saturday August 12th

SABNES is looking for help watering the 3000+ native plants planted this spring on newly created hummocks in Salmon Arm Bay. Hundreds of local students and volunteers helped create the beginnings of a diverse habitat for wildlife this spring, but the plants need a little more TLC to make it through the hot summer. Details of this Saturday's even are below - as this event is being put on by SABNES, please contact Kim Fulton on 250-309-6535 with any questions. When:  Saturday August 12 anytime between 8am - 12pm Where:  Hummocks at Raven Gate of Foreshore Trail ( 1060 47th Ave NE Salmon Arm )  Please bring: your favourite weeding tool, a water bucket, a smaller 1 or 2L container for watering, gloves, drinking water, and a snack. You should wear: a hat, long pants, sturdy closed toe footwear, sunscreen, and sunglasses.    

Wanted: Reports of Barn Swallow Nests and Bat Roosts on the South Coast

Above: Barn swallow and chicks in nest. Photo: TexasEagle   The Sunshine Coast Wildlife Project is asking for the community’s help in monitoring populations of two threatened wildlife groups: swallows and bats. Both groups often live in proximity to humans.    The Barn Swallow was once one of world’s most widespread and common birds, but has experience devastating population declines, declining by more than 90% across North America in the past 40 years. Barn Swallows nest on houses, barns, garages, sheds, and bridges, upon which they build cup-shaped nests of mud mixed with grasses. Many bats have adapted to live in human structures, and maternity colonies may be found in the summer under roofs or siding, or in attics, barns, or other buildings.   Half on BC’s bats are species at risk, and the recent arrival of White Nose Syndrome on the west coast has dramatically increased the threat.    Community members can help these threatened animals by reporting swallow nests and bat roost on their property so they can be included in province-wide monitoring efforts. Wildlife Project biologists can provide guidance about how to coexist with the animals, or options for exclusion if desired. Please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 604-989-1007...
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Help Stop Whirling Disease from Entering BC

Photo: State of Colorado Last August, Canada's first case of whirling disease was confirmed at Johnson Lake within Banff National Park. Alberta's Bow River, Red Deer and Oldman River watersheds have now been declared infected with whirling disease by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, and the rest of the province declared a buffer zone (see map ). The disease devastated wild trout populations in the Western United States in the 90s, but its effects on fish populations can vary. In a recent interview with the Calgary Herald , Aquatic Invasive Specialist Kate Wilson said scientists are unsure how the disease will impact Alberta's wild fish. As there's no cure for whirling disease, Alberta is focused on monitoring, education and following protocols to stop its spread. Though BC has not (yet) had a confirmed case of whirling disease, HCTF is helping to fund a coordinator to lead a whirling disease monitoring and education program in BC. Here's a quick primer on whirling disease, and what you can do to help stop it from spreading.  What causes whirling disease? Whirling disease is caused by a microscopic parasite (Myxobolus cerebralis) that infects both fish and freshwater worms during different phases of its lifecycle.                       What are the symptoms? In fish, the parasite affects the...
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